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I scrolled and scrolled, and I was being reeled in like a fish who couldn’t resist the tie line.  It had me in it’s grip and with each new post about Trump, Bannon or Devos I tapped on the article and read it like a soap opera addict, I couldn’t wait for the new plot line to come out each day.  However, unlike a soap opera which isn’t real, what I was reading was and I became engrossed in it, scrolling to find more stories and replying with intensity and a sense of feeling I was doing my duty in trying to get others to see what was happening to this country…but was I? or was I just involving myself in heavy drama and having this be a focus to steer me away from the death of my best friend.  Whatever the reason being, I noticed that I was experiencing stomach pains and nausea while I would be engrossed in political conversations and that when I stopped writing and got out of Facebook, my stomach started to calm down. I was having Trump stress pains and it wasn’t good.  I decided this wasn’t worth my health, it wasn’t worth getting so upset that I wanted to kick something or reach through my computer and yell at certain people who refused to see the hatred, it was causing me to be angry, that which I was upset for seeing happen, was happening to me. I decided to pull away.  I wondered, what will it be like if I change my role here?  What if I just become a silent observer? Can I do this? Can I read a news story or a post about something that infuriates me and not give my opinion about it?  It was time to find out.  I also wanted to know in this world of “socialness” what would happen if I stopped being social.  Did the world need to read about my viewpoints or see my posts on my dating foibles or viewpoints, I wasn’t sure but thought it would make an interesting experiment to not say a thing.  The exception to this was I did allow myself to post in the classified sections of Facebook.  I sell things here and there and didn’t want to stop myself from being able to make a little money here and there.

 

The silent journey begins….

 

The first week was hard, I would read a post and immediately click on the comment button and start to furiously write but then I would stop, hit back space and take a deep breath.  I would remind myself that I didn’t’ have to give my 2 cents on everything out there.  I just became about scrolling and reading and taking it in.  It was hard though to not comment when people would post a picture or video of an event that they were participating in or a birthday they were having.  To those birthdays I haven’t written a Happy Birthday to , I apologize but I am sending you hugs and love.  I would still watch cute cat videos but this time not post them. I would still look at the posts that asked all sorts of questions but not answer them.  Three weeks in and it was a little bit easier.  I would still get notifications but now they were mainly for classified ads or groups I was a part of.  The content on my page also changed drastically, from showing friends videos to showing more stories from 22 words and the Los Angeles Times.  My ads even changed, for some reason Facebook thinks I am bulimic because I must have read a story on it…and no I am not bulimic or anorexic.   I noticed that my friends still thought I was online based on answers they put on the questionnaires the filled out.  You know those posts that ask you things like name 4 places you have been, name 4 of your nick names.  These almost always have a question at that bottom saying name someone you know will respond or repost this.  My friends, even a month and a half after I stopped posting, still put my name.  I didn’t respond or say anything but I was amused by it.  I felt like the girl who wasn’t invited to the party but everyone keeps acting like I was there.  Oh you remember when so and so did this at the party and it was so funny and my response being, no I don’t know I wasn’t there.  They give you that inquisitive look, no, no you were there, I remember.  You shake your head and say flatly, nope it wasn’t me and they aren’t sure what to say because they really thought you had been invited or had been there but you weren’t.  I did have one friend who wrote to me on messenger, about 2 ½ weeks after I had stopped writing. I almost always replied to her sweet posts about her children and wonderful mate and she wanted to make sure I was okay.  It was very touching to me and I wrote her back explaining what I was doing.  I did write to her on and off through out the 2 months.

Not being contacted or having most people notice I was gone made me  wonder about my presence as a person and how strong is it really?  Not very when it comes to social media.   It hurt to some degree but I just took it in and realized it was something I needed to work through and figure out.  How I do this I am not 100% sure of but I know I am open to growing and also open to connecting with people on a deeper level.

I do need to note that I have certain people on Facebook, such as Family and close friends that I talked to outside of the Facebook world.  It is interesting because none of them said anything to me about not posting or not seeing me not commenting on their feeds.  I wasn’t completely void of connection with people.

In the last few weeks of not posting on Facebook, I find myself wanting to comment on certain posts of people who are going through specific things. I have a friend who just had a baby, a beautiful boy. I am so incredibly happy for her and her husband. I love seeing the pictures even though I think she worries she will be one of those moms who is in overkill mode with the pictures, she is not and believe me with all the trauma going on in the world, seeing a sweet baby sleeping in his father’s arms is something I want to see more of.

I am ready to enter the world of Facebook again but this time realizing that it is just a website, not a home. It is social…yes but more in a acquaintance sort of way. I also realize that in life I don’t want to be a part of a lot of the surface stuff, the how’s the weather conversations or what is considered to be small talk but I also don’t want to be in a war all the time with the political turmoil that is all around us.  Peace within myself and my body is more important now. It is more important to connect with people who want to go somewhere and have coffee or who want to connect and see how each other are doing.  I step back into this wondering what is next with it….How do I use this social media to enhance my life?  Do I use it to report to those I know what I am doing, after all a lot of the people on Facebook that I am friends with don’t live in the same city or even state, some don’t’ even live in the same country so it is not like I can sit down and have  a coffee with them. One of the reasons I love Facebook is for just this reason. I can see the people (whom I used to hang out with when they lived in LA ), what they are up to, what their children are doing.

The world we live in now has connection through online means.  It is a vessel but it is not the complete ship, I have realized that I need more, more people to laugh with, more people to sit across a table and see their smile light up or be in a movie theatre eating popcorn together and bonding over our love for the Jedi’s.  This is a connection that isn’t the same through a screen, it can’t hug me or bring me food when a friend has died and these are the connections I seek.  I love Facebook for the people, for the funny cat videos, for the inspiring stories and for seeing people whom I love dearly and miss across the miles but it is time, time for me to be in a non virtual world so that I can one day post about me and my friends being at a dinner table and laughing and connecting, instead of scrolling though my feed and seeing others do this and wishing it was me.

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In Between

I rarely just post my thoughts or observations on here but I am going to attempt to.  Here goes:

I realized to day that I am in an in between place in society.  That is to say I don’t have a group that quite fits.  I am in my late 40’s and most people my age are married with kids, living in a house that they own or rent. How can I relate to these people at a dinner table….(conversation), Oh we took out a second mortgage on the house today so we can start paying for Michael juniors college.  We are hoping he gets into UCLA.  ….hmmm, well what do I say to this?  I am going to community college let me talk to your son.  That is the other aspect of my life that is different.  I am surrounded by young students in their late teens and early twenties.  They are just starting out in their life, they grew up in the 90’s the years of grunge and teletubbies, and I grew up with The Jetsons and bell bottoms.  They like to play beer pong when they have a party, in my day we did shots (usually tequila) but those days are long gone.  I laugh when they tell me they are old and they just turned 21.  What the heck does that make me, old geiser.  I suppose in some of their eyes I am.  At times I feel that way too.  I have fun when around them, most of the time but can’t really relate to some of the antics and the laid back attitudes.  In my younger years we went dancing on Friday and often Saturday nights but they like to hang out, play beer pong or drink beers.

Here I am, not sure where to go or how to find a group of people that fit.  I don’t own a car so it isn’t always easy to go to things at night, it can be scary coming home at 12:30 in Los Angeles.  A lot of my friends have moved or are very busy with families of their own.  I find myself having less and less people to do stuff with on the weekends.

I suppose I need to join groups on meetup.com or something similar to that.  I have gone to a few events with them and they keep me busy but yet to connect with anyone.

In between, middle aged with a child like heart but an adult mind, both in spirit.

The Most Addictive Sites

          surf the  world wide web-www-http Stock Photo - 3541755

Bored on a Monday?  Going to the web and checking all the usual stuff, Email, Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter but wondering what else might be out there?  More, I need more, give me more.  This was my plight and I found this side that helped me out a little, maybe not a complete earth shaker but took up some time and I found some great places to go to have some fun and be entertained (isn’t that one of the biggest reasons for the web?)  This is the link, hope you enjoy.

http://netforbeginners.about.com/od/weirdwebculture/tp/The-Most-Addictive-Websites-of-2012.htm

M*A*S*H* celebrates 40 years

Ever since I was a little I loved M*A*S*H*.  I didn’t fully understand it as a young girl in the 70’s,  I loved watching Hawkeye, BJ and Frank and their antics.  I couldn’t decide who I had a crush on more Hawkeye or BJ.  They were both delightful in their own ways.

As I got older and continued to watch I grasped the show and what it mean’t to me.  The show connects to life.  To its sorrows, joys and craziness, which we  get through with laughter and pain.

Congratulations to the cast and crew of what is my favorite show.

Here is an article from Examiner.com about TVLand which celebrated the anniversary on the original airdate, September 17th.

TV Land to celebrate 40th anniversary of ‘MASH’ with marathon, reunions, trivia

TV Land is set to celebrate the 40th anniversary of "M*A*S*H."
TV Land is set to celebrate the 40th anniversary of “M*A*S*H.”
Credits:
TV Land/CBS

On August 31, executives from TV Land revealed details about the network’s plans to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the TV classic “M*A*S*H.” The month-long celebration will include a 10-hour marathon on Labor Day and re-broadcasts of the 20th and 30th reunion specials. Plus, the network will add in some “M*A*S*H” trivia on its website and Facebook pages. It all adds up to a great September for longtime “M*A*S*H” fans.

The celebration kicks off on Sunday, September 2 with the airing of “M*A*S*H: 30th Anniversary Reunion” and a day-long marathon on Labor Day, Monday, September 3 from 8:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. ET/PT on TV Land. The 20th reunion special, “Memories of M*A*S*H” is set to air on Sunday, September 9. The “M*A*S*H” pilot and 3-hour series finale will air on Sunday, September 16. Throughout the month of September, episodes of “M*A*S*H” will air on weekdays.

“Goodbye, Farewell and Amen” was the 251st and final episode of “M*A*S*H.” It first aired on February 28, 1983 and was the most watched television broadcast in American history from 1983-2010. An astonishing audience of 125 million tuned in for the final farewell. It was finally passed in total viewership by Super Bowl XLIV, but not in ratings or share.

Based on the 1970 Robert Altman film of the same name, “M*A*S*H” revolved around life at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, where wounded and sick soldiers were treated. The show centered around…

  • Dr. Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce (Alan Alda) and Dr. “Trapper” John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers), two brilliant surgeons often preoccupied with attractive nurses, practical jokes and merry-making, all while disregarding military decorum.
  • Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Lt. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan (Loretta Swit), whose secret love affair was no secret.
  • Lt. Colonel Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson), the camp commander who gave “Hawkeye” and “Trapper” free reign, further irritating Burns and “Hot Lips.”
  • Corporal Walter “Radar” O’Reilly (Gary Burghoff), Lt. Blake’s lovable assistant.
  • Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr), a doctor’s aide in the operating room who wore women’s clothing in hopes of being discharged.
  • Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher), who ran an orphanage and served as the unit’s chaplain.

“M*A*S*H” ran for eleven seasons from 1972-1983. The series won a total of 14 Emmy Awards, plus seven Golden Globe Awards, seven Directors Guild of America Awards, a Peabody Award, and two Humanitas Prize Awards.

Fun trivia about “M*A*S*H”:

To get set for the 40th anniversary, here is a bit of trivia about the iconic series, from IMDB.

  • By the time the series ended, three of the regulars were promoted: Klinger (Jamie Farr) from Corporal to Sergeant, and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher) from Lieutenant to Captain. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel when he was shipped back to the US following Margaret’s marriage.
  • Radar’s teddy bear, once housed at the Smithsonian, was sold at auction July 29, 2005, for $11,800. (It was originally found on the Fox Ranch, where the series was filmed, and became part of the show.)
  • Tom Skerritt was approached to reprise his role as Duke Forrest on the series but he declined, because he felt a TV version of the movie would be unsuccessful.
  • Harry Morgan, who played Col. Potter, had an earlier guest appearance as a crazy General named Steele.
  • Jamie Farr and Alan Alda were the only two cast members to have actually served in the US Army in Korea. Both of them did their tours of duty after the 1953 ceasefire.
  • “M*A*S*H” stands for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.
  • Gary Burghoff’s left hand was slightly deformed, and he took great pains to hide or de-emphasize it during filming. He did this by always holding something (like a clipboard), or keeping that hand in his pocket.
  • All of the replacement characters (BJ, Col. Potter, and Charles) lasted longer then the characters they replaced (Trapper, Henry, and Frank).
  • Alan Alda had a running guest appearance on the TV show ER in which he played Dr. Gabriel Lawrence, who reminisced about being a doctor in a war.
  • Klinger’s attempts to be thrown out of the Army by wearing women’s clothing were inspired by Lenny Bruce, who received a dishonorable discharge from the Navy by dressing as a WAVE.
  • The ubiquitous helicopters were military versions of the Bell 47. In the real Korean War, the OH-13s evacuated 80% of American casualties.
  • Much like their onscreen counterparts, the cast bonded and became a “family” on the set, in response to the relative remoteness of the Fox Ranch and the cold weather when filming began.
  • Klinger was only going to appear in one episode. However, he proved so popular that he became a regular.
  • Both Major Margaret Houlihan and Cpl. Max Klinger were married (Margaret in person, Klinger over the phone) and divorced during their service at the 4077th. They shared the same wedding dress.
  • On Sesame Street, Big Bird’s teddy bear is named Radar. This is in homage to Radar O’Reilly’s teddy bear.
  • Alan Alda was the only actor to appear in every episode.
  • Dr. Michael DeBakey, the physician largely credited with the creation of M*A*S*H units for the U.S. Army, died in July 2008. He was two months shy of turning 100 years old.

Since We Said Hello

Seems like forever since we said Hello
I have been going through so much
I was afraid to let you in
Afraid to open up
In such a wide open space
Afraid no one would hear me
or Worse they would and wouldn’t care

I have got stronger in this time apart
Ready to say what’s in my heart
Ready to spread the wings and fly
Hoping your near
Waving Hi

The following article is taken from Forbes.com and also now on Yahoo.com

I read it and it didn’t give me much insight about why the sexes choose the cars that they do except that the men choose pick up trucks for the storage and ruggedness. I noticed the cars men choose are Porsche’s and Hummers, pretty cool cars and the women choose Saturn’s and Hyundai’s….boring. What about the other cars…Mercede’s, BMV, Audi’s, Toyota? Didn’t list any of these popular cars. I wonder if a survey was done or they just spoke with a few dealers regarding which cars are more bought. If I were rich I would go out and buy a sports car today just to show not only men are the ones who like them. I would rather see an article listing the 10 most bought cars, which sex bought them and why? (Interviews with each sex and what appeals to them about that car). I am certainly not running out to my Hyundai dealer because this article suggests that more women buy them. There also was no mention of Hybrid cars, SUV’s. I think this article is lacking in information. Let me know what you think?

Most Popular Cars For Men And Women
Want a ”manly” car? Opt for a pickup. Feeling like a more feminine set of wheels? Go visit your local Saturn, Honda or Volkswagen dealer.
By Peter Hoy
provided by:

Volkswagen Beetle
To buy the Chevy Silverado heavy-duty pickup, some might argue that in addition to the $22,225 sticker price, you also need a Y chromosome. That’s because 93% of the truck’s buyers are men. In fact, males own about nine out of 10 heavy-duty pickup trucks on the road, according to findings by AutoPacific, a market research firm focused on the auto industry.

Womens’ tastes run a little more refined. AutoPacific found that female buyers most often choose models by Saturn, Honda and Volkswagen.

What gives? Though car companies typically avoid making gender-specific vehicles, says Jim Hossick, vice president and senior consultant at AutoPacific, “some cars are more masculine or feminine by nature.”

The market’s male-friendly cars include the Ford F-350 and the Dodge Ram, of which men own 93% and 89%, respectively. Chrysler spokesperson Dan Bodene says it is a combination of marketing and design that has created such disproportionate numbers.

The “Built Ford Tough” tag line, for example, can be heard during commercial breaks in NFL games, and other ads for the beefy F-Series feature burly men in cowboy hats.

“It depends on the model, but the Ram tends to be used by guys who need the capability, either as heads of households hauling a lot of stuff, or on job sites in male-dominated professions,” says Bodene. Consequently, door handles need to be large enough for a man’s gloved hand, and seats need to be able to move far enough away from the steering wheel to accommodate larger bodies–the average American man is five and half inches taller and 27 pounds heavier than the average woman.

But it’s an equal-opportunity marketplace, and carmakers try to design vehicles–even heavy-duty pickups–that won’t discourage any potential buyers. Tailgates must be light enough for all types of people to lift, and seatbelts must be comfortable for male and female body types.
Women-Friendly Wheels
While AutoPacific’s data shows brands such as Hummer, Dodge, Porsche and GMC are most popular among men, models produced by Saturn, Honda, Volkswagen and Hyundai are the biggest hits with female drivers.

An estimated 65% of Volkswagen Beetle Convertible buyers are female. The New Beetle, with a 5-cylinder engine, is nearing a decade of production; the soft-top model came on the market in 2003.

VW spokesperson Keith Price acknowledges the New Beetle is purchased and driven more by females, but says it was not a result of designers trying to make a women’s car.

“It happened more organically,” says Price, explaining that the car was initially launched to have dual appeal. After the New Beetle had been out for a few years, and sales data started piling up, VW marketers then found ways to benefit from its popularity among women–stylish designs cues and more feminine colors such as “gecko green” and “sunflower yellow.”

“The female appeal of the car is one of the things that has sustained it over the years without a great deal of aesthetic change,” says Price, “but VW does absolutely not consider it ‘a woman’s car.'”
All Show and No Go
In fact, the notion of a “female” automobile has become long outdated.

“People who have tried to make a vehicle that is female-centric have failed,” says Hossick. “Women might buy a ‘man’s’ vehicle, but men won’t buy a ‘women’s’ car.”

The most famous attempt was the Dodge LaFemme, dreamt up by marketers trying to capitalize on the growing interest in automobile ownership among women in the early 1950s. The car sported pink upholstery patterned with rosebuds and came with a matching purse, raincoat and umbrella. It was outfitted with lipstick holders and painted a new shade, dubbed Heather Rose.

Hyundai Tucson

Dodge gave it a 218-Hp V8 engine–a lot more muscle than today’s top sellers among women, like the 140-Hp Hyundai Tucson–but the LaFemme only made it through two years of production, with sales estimated around 2,500.

“Women were generally offended by it, and men wouldn’t touch it with a stick,” says Hossick. “If you can’t sell a car to boys and you can’t sell it to girls, then the market is going to be pretty small.”

Should celebrities be skinny all the time? If a woman is size 12 does that make her fat? What about a size 5 or 8? The average woman in America is size 12 to 14 but the media wants us to strive to be a size 4. Would this be healthy for some? Here is one woman who I knew from the start I liked, used to be just for her voice but now her personality make me like her even more. See for yourself and let me know what you think?

Kelly Clarkson:

I’m Tired of Hearing

“the Fat Joke”

Us Magazine – June 5, 2009 6:07 AM PDT

Story photo: Kelly Clarkson: I'm Tired of Hearing Kelly Clarkson attends Z100’s Zootopia 2009 presented by IZOD FRAGRANCE at Izod Center on May 16, 2009 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
Jamie McCarthy/WireImage for Clear Channel Radio
Us Magazine

Kelly Clarkson says she’s tired of being bullied over her weight.

“For seven years it’s been happening. It’s like, ‘OK cool, the fat joke,'” she said during an interview with 2Day FM’s Kyle and Jackie O Show in Australia.

Despite the taunts, the American Idol champ says, “I love my body. I’m very much OK with it. I don’t think artists are ever the ones who have the problem with their weight, it is other people.”

Clarkson has also come under scrutiny over her sexuality. She says she doesn’t care if people think she is gay.

Her only gripe?

“The rumors are not helping me on the dating front!” she said. “I prefer the boys. I’m extremely flattered when I do get hit on by girls, and I think it’s hot, but I’m not into it. I like boys.”

She said she’s in no rush to find Mr. Right.

“I’m only 27, not 40 and still single!” she said. “I enjoy being single, I love work and I think people are so passive with relationships and I’m not that person.”

Added Clarkson, “I’m an extremist, I’m either in a relationship or I’m not. I’m honest about it and I’ll tell people, it’s just there’s nothing to tell. I have a very good life.”

http://omg.yahoo.com/news/kelly-clarkson-i-m-tired-of-hearing-the-fat-joke/23417?nc